Heat-related Illness: Static Maps

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These maps show the proportion of populations that are vulnerable to heat-related illnesses in Minnesota. Maps are broken down by US Census subdivision


Population Vulnerability: Age

Percent of population under age 5

Source: American Community Survey, 2009-2013. Percent of the county subdivision's population that are under age 5. "No Data" areas had too few sample observations to compute an estimate.

Percent of population that are males age 15 to 34

Source: American Community Survey, 2009-2013. Percent of the county subdivision's population that are males age 15 to 34. "No Data" areas had too few sample observations to compute an estimate.

Minnesota counties

 

Under Age 5

Infants and children are more vulnerable to heat because they do not regulate their body temperature as well as adults.

Males age 15 to 34

Young men are prone to heat-related illness, possibly due to their occupation or outdoor hobbies.


Population Vulnerability: Social Factors

Percent of population that are age 65+ and living alone.

Source: American Community Survey, 2009-2013. Percent of the county subdivision's population that are age 65+ and living alone. "No Data" areas had too few sample observations to compute an estimate.

Percent of population that under 185% FPL

Source: American Community Survey, 2009-2013. Percent of the county subdivision's population that earn under 185% Federal Poverty Level. "No Data" areas had too few sample observations to compute an estimate.

Minnesota counties

 

Elderly living alone

People age 65 and over who are living alone are vulnerable to heat-related illness because they have more chronic diseases and are less able to regulate their body temperature. Living alone puts them at greater risk for heat-related illnesses, since there is no one to see the signs of heat-related illness and help them.

Poverty

People of low income are less likely to have or use air-conditioning. They also may lack resources to seek care for heat-related illness.