Infant Mortality: Facts & Figures


Each year, about 350 babies die in MN

The leading causes of infant death in the U.S. are birth defects, disorders related to premature birth and low birth weight, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), conditions due to pregnancy complications, and injury. Infant mortality includes:

  • Perinatal mortality (death when less than 7 days old, plus fetal deaths of 28 weeks gestation or more)
  • Neonatal mortality (death in the first 27 days of life). The leading causes of neonatal death are disorders related to premature birth and low birth weight. 
  • Postneonatal mortality (death from the infant's 28th day, but within the first year). These deaths reflect events in infancy and are more likely to reflect environmental factors. SIDS is the leading cause of postneonatal mortality. 

Infant mortality in MN is below US levels

Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births in MN and the US.

Minnesota infant mortality rates are lower than the national average. There has been a general downward trend in the overall infant mortality rate in Minnesota. However, there are striking disparities in these outcomes for certain populations in Minnesota.


Infants of younger and older mothers are at greater risk

Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births in MN, by maternal age. 2009-2013.

In Minnesota, babies born to younger and older mothers have a higher rate of infant mortality. 


Striking racial/ethnic disparities in infant mortality

Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births in MN, by maternal race/ethnicity. 2009-2013.
Note: Racial categories White, Black, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian are non-Hispanic. 

In Minnesota, American Indians and black people have higher rates of infant mortality than other racial/ethnic groups. Additional work is needed to eliminate these disparities and to ensure that all babies in our state have the opportunity for a healthy life. 


Infant mortality throughout Minnesota

Infant mortality rate per 1,00 live births in MN, 2009-2013.
Infant Mortality in Minnesota, Map
† Unstable: rates based on counts of 20 or under should be interpreted with caution: the rate may be unstable because it can change dramatically with the addition or subtraction of one case.
‡ Supressed: to protect individual privacy, reproductive and birth outcome counts from 1 to 5 are suppressed.
Download the data.
County Rate per 1,000 births
Aitkin **
Anoka 4.7
Becker 6.6*
Beltrami 10.1
Benton 5.3*
Big Stone **
Blue Earth 5*
Brown **
Carlton 3.7*
Carver 4.4
Cass 4.8*
Chippewa **
Chisago 5.9*
Clay 5.1*
Clearwater **
Cook **
Cottonwood **
Crow Wing 4.6*
Dakota 3.7
Dodge **
Douglas 5.9*
Faribault **
Fillmore **
Freeborn 6.1*
Goodhue 5.6*
Grant **
Hennepin 4.8
Houston **
Hubbard **
Isanti 4.7*
Itasca 5.2*
Jackson **
Kanabec **
Kandiyohi 3.5*
Kittson **
Koochiching **
Lac qui Parle **
Lake **
Lake of the Woods 0
Le Sueur 3.7*
Lincoln **
Lyon 4.9*
McLeod 3.6*
Mahnomen 13.5*
Marshall **
Martin 5.5*
Meeker **
Mille Lacs 6*
Morrison 4*
Mower 5.4*
Murray **
Nicollet 7.8*
Nobles 6.7*
Norman **
Olmsted 5.7
Otter Tail 5.8*
Pennington 7.7*
Pine 9.3*
Pipestone **
Polk 5.1*
Pope 11.3*
Ramsey 5.6
Red Lake 0
Redwood **
Renville **
Rice 4.1*
Rock **
Roseau **
St. Louis 5.7
Scott 3.2
Sherburne 4.7
Sibley **
Stearns 4
Steele 3.8*
Stevens **
Swift **
Todd 5.5*
Traverse **
Wabasha **
Wadena **
Waseca **
Washington 4
Watonwan **
Wilkin **
Winona 3.4*
Wright 4.6
Yellow Medicine 0
* Unstable: rates based on counts of 20 or under should be interpreted with caution: the rate may be unstable because it can change dramatically with the addition or subtraction of one case.
** Supressed: to protect individual privacy, reproductive and birth outcome counts from 1 to 5 are suppressed.Download these data.

Take steps to protect your baby's health

There are things you can do to have a healthy pregnancy such as: quit smoking, stop illegal drug and alcohol abuse; eat well; reduce stress; get prenatal care; and manage chronic illness and other medical problems.

Parents and caregivers should always place sleeping infants on their backs. Research has found that infants who sleep on their stomachs or sides are at higher risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS. Babies should also sleep in a crib instead of their parents' bed.