Oral Health

Denture ownership and use (older adults in nursing homes)

Older adult denture ownership and/or use by:


Dentures help individuals with tooth loss to maintain a healthy lifestyle

Dentures are removable appliances or plates that can replace missing teeth. They are meant to be worn once teeth are removed and the gums and tissues have healed. There are two main types of dentures: full dentures and partial dentures.

Dentures help individuals with tooth loss to maintain a healthy lifestyle, including the ability to speak, eat and socialize, while improving facial appearance, self-esteem, and quality of life.


Oral hygiene and yearly dental visits are important for denture users

Good oral hygiene and seeing a dentist at least once a year is important to prevent oral infections, maintain proper denture fit, and detect oral diseases and conditions early (e.g. cancer).

Those with some natural teeth remaining need to brush their teeth with fluoridated toothpaste twice a day or after meals and floss daily. Dentures need to be removed and cleaned daily and the mouth (gums, tongue, cheeks and roof of mouth) cleaned with a soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste. See Denture Care: How do I clean dentures?


2 in 5 adults aged 65 years and older living in Minnesota nursing homes own dentures

In 2016, 42 percent of older adults living in Minnesota nursing homes – about 25,344 individuals – owned dentures. There were no significant differences in the proportion of older adults that own dentures by sex or age group. Race and ethnicity could not be analyzed due to the low proportion of non-White or Hispanic residents in the sample.

2 out of every 5
Minnesota older adults (65 years and older) in nursing homes

(41.9%, 95% CI = 37.2 to 46.7; n = 420 of 944)
Owned dentures
2016


7 in 10 adults aged 65 years and older living in Minnesota nursing homes who own dentures have a full denture set

Use of partial and/or full dentures by location in the upper and lower jawbones among older adults in Minnesota nursing homes, 2016

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Oral Health Program. Older Adult Basic Screening Survey.

Data is based on an open mouth screening – the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors (ASTDD) standardized survey. Analyzable sample size = 944 of 1,032 residents screened within a stratified random sample of 31 Minnesota Medicare or Medicaid eligible skilled nursing facilities with at least 30 beds. Denture ownership was unknown for 13 residents. See About the Data: Basic Screening Survey for Older Adults for more information.

Among residents who owned dentures in 2016:

  • 77 percent had full dentures of the lower and upper jawbones.
  • 15 percent had a partial denture of the lower jawbone and a full denture of the upper jawbone.
  • 7 percent had partial dentures of the upper and lower jawbones.
  • 1 percent had a full denture of the lower jawbone and a partial denture of the upper jawbone.

There were no significant differences in the proportion of older adults who own dentures in terms of denture type (partial or full) and location (lower or upper jawbone) by sex or age group. Race and ethnicity could not be analyzed due to the low proportion of non-White or Hispanic residents in the sample.


Almost 3 in 10 adults aged 65 years and older living in Minnesota nursing homes who have impaired dental function (fewer than 20 teeth) need dentures

Tooth loss among older adults in Minnesota nursing homes by denture ownership, 2016

Source: Minnesota Department of Health, Oral Health Program. Older Adult Basic Screening Survey.

Data is based on an open mouth screening – the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors (ASTDD) standardized survey. Analyzable sample size = 944 of 1,032 residents screened within a stratified random sample of 31 Minnesota Medicare or Medicaid eligible skilled nursing facilities with at least 30 beds. Denture use was unknown for 31 residents. See About the Data: Basic Screening Survey for Older Adults for more information.

In 2016, among residents with impaired dental function (fewer than 20 natural teeth):

  • Non-denture users – 28 percent did not have contact of their back teeth (posterior occlusal contacts) on either the left or right side of the mouth. These individuals could benefit from wearing dentures to prevent destruction of teeth and wearing down of the jawbones.
  • Denture users – 21 percent did not have contact of their back teeth (posterior occlusal contacts) on either the left or right side of the mouth. This could mean improper denture fit.