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Children dental visits 

Yearly dental visits by:


Yearly dental visits can identify oral problems early and prevent tooth decay

Examples of dental care include check-ups, dental cleanings, x-rays, or filling cavities. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend at least one dental visit each year, starting by the child’s first birthday or when the first tooth appears.


8 in 10 Minnesota children have at least one yearly dental visit

During 2011 to 2012, 8 out of 10 children surveyed had a dental visit within the past year.

8 out of every 10
Minnesota children (1 to 17 years) (76.3%)

Have at least one yearly dental visit
2011 to 2012


Children under age 6 are less likely to have dental visits

Children past year dental visit by age, 2011 to 2012

Source: National Survey of Children's Health.

Data indicator

1 to 5 years

6 to 11 years

12 to 17 years

United States

Percent children (1 to 17 years) with at least one past year dental visit

54.7%

87.9%

85.5%

95% Confidence Interval

53.4 to 56.1

87.0 to 88.8

84.5 to 86.4

Number children (1 to 17 years) with at least one past year dental visit

13,928

28,173

30,676

Estimated population

10,867,095

21,463,992

21,425,384

Minnesota

Percent children (1 to 17 years) with at least one past year dental visit

44.2%

91.3%

87.9%

95% Confidence Interval

38.2 to 50.2

87.9 to 94.6

83.9 to 91.9

Number children (1 to 17 years) with at least one past year dental visit

255

537

595

Estimated population

157,114

408,947

358,449

Data is based on a telephone survey of parent or guardian reported measures of non-institutionalized children (i.e., children not in jail, prison, or hospital setting). Total sample: United States = 90,390 and Minnesota = 1,738. Percentages are weighted to population characteristics. See About the Data: National Survey of Children’s Health for more information.

During 2011 to 2012, Minnesota children under age 6 were 2.0 times less likely to have had a dental visit within the past year compared to children 6 to 17 years.

Nationally, children under age 6 were 1.6 times less likely to have had a dental visit within the past year compared to children 6 to 17 years.


Children in poverty are less likely to have yearly dental visits

Children past year dental visit by household poverty level, 2011 to 2012

Data source: National Survey of Children's Health.

Data indicator

0 to 99% federal poverty level (lowest income)

100 to 199% federal poverty level

200 to 399% federal poverty level

400% or more federal poverty level

United States

Percent children (1 to 17 years) with at least one past year dental visit

68.6%

73.5%

80.1%

85.2%

95% Confidence Interval

67.0 to 70.3

71.9 to 75.0

79.1 to 81.2

84.3 to 86.1

Number children (1 to 17 years) with at least one past year dental visit

9,712

12,221

22,336

28,508

Estimated population

10,561,812

11,001,826

15,695,378

16,497,455

Minnesota

Percent children (1 to 17 years) with at least one past year dental visit

61.0%

73.6%

78.6%

84.5%

95% Confidence Interval

51.0 to 70.9

66.0 to 81.2

71.8 to 81.4

80.6 to 88.3

Number children (1 to 17 years) with at least one past year dental visit

91

177

475

644

Estimated population

108,491

150,354

335,000

330,165

Data is based on a telephone survey of parent or guardian reported measures of non-institutionalized children (i.e., children not in jail, prison, or hospital setting). Total sample: United States = 90,390 and Minnesota = 1,738. Percentages are weighted to population characteristics. See About the Data: National Survey of Children’s Health for more information.

Federal Poverty Level in the National Survey of Children’s Health data uses the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Poverty Guidelines calculated from parent or guardian reported income to determine program and benefit eligibility. Those above 400% of the federal poverty level have more income than those at or below 100%.

In Minnesota during 2011 to 2012, 61 percent of children living in households below 100% of the federal poverty level had a dental visit within the past year compared to 85 percent of children living in households at or above 400% of the federal poverty level.

In the United States during 2011 to 2012, children living in households below 100% of the federal poverty level were 1.2 times less likely to have had a dental visit within the past year compared to children living in households at or above 400% of the federal poverty level.

To learn more about poverty measures visit Poverty & Income on the MN Data Access portal.