About the recommended childhood immunizations data

These data tell us the percentage of Minnesota children ages 24-35 months up-to-date on recommended childhood vaccines. Data are available for the state and by county since 2010 and are based on immunization records in the Minnesota Immunization Information Connection (MIIC).

The childhood immunization data can be used to monitor state- and county-level immunization coverage and progress towards national, state, and local coverage goals. The data can also help to identify populations at risk for vaccine-preventable disease and encourage public health actions and policies aimed at increasing immunization.

The data cannot tell us why children are not up-to-date. Some children may not have ready access to all the recommended vaccines, and some parents may choose not to vaccinate. Also, some children may have received vaccinations that are not recorded in MIIC.

Data are based on vaccination records in the Minnesota Immunization Information Connection (MIIC), a confidential immunization information system. Immunization records in MIIC are submitted by participating health care providers.

  • 2010 Data: Vaccination coverage among children ages 24-35 months with two or more non-influenza vaccinations in MIIC. Includes children born July 2007 through June 2008 who were up-to-date at time of analysis in August 2010.
  • 2011 Data: Vaccination coverage among children ages 24-35 months with two or more non-influenza vaccinations in MIIC. Includes children born July 2008 through June 2009 who were up-to-date at time of analysis in August 2011.
  • 2012 Data: Vaccination coverage among children ages 24-35 months with two or more non-influenza vaccinations in MIIC. Includes children born July 2009 through June 2010 who were up-to-date at time of analysis in August 2012.
  • 2013 Data: Vaccination coverage among children ages 24-35 months with two or more non-influenza vaccinations in MIIC. Includes children born July 2010 through June 2011 who were up-to-date at time of analysis in August 2013.
  • 2014 Data: Vaccination coverage among children ages 24-35 months with two or more non-influenza vaccinations in MIIC. Includes children born July 2011 through June 2012 who were up-to-date at time of analysis in July 2014.
  • 2015 Data: Vaccination coverage among children ages 24-35 months in MIIC. Includes children born July 2012 through June 2013 who were up-to-date at 24 months. Analyzed as of July 2015.
  • 2016 Data: Vaccination coverage among children ages 24-35 months in MIIC. Includes children born July 2013 through June 2014 who were up-to-date at 24 months. Analyzed as of August 2016.
  • 2017 Data: Vaccination coverage among children ages 24-35 months in MIIC. Includes children born July 2014 through June 2015 who were up-to-date at 24 months. Analyzed as of August 2017.

Note: In 2015, there was a change in methodology for calculating up-to-date rates. Previously, the denominator only included children ages 24-35 months with two or more non-influenza vaccinations on their MIIC record. The numerator included all children in this group who were up-to-date at time of analysis. Beginning in 2015, the denominator includes all children ages 24-35 months in MIIC, and the numerator only includes children in this group who were up-to-date at 24 months.

Although MIIC is a useful resource for real-time assessments of state and county immunization percentages in Minnesota, MIIC data may underestimate the actual percent of children receiving vaccines due to several limitations:

  • Health care provider participation in MIIC is voluntary. Although approximately 90 percent of Minnesota health care providers routinely submit immunization data to MIIC, not all those who participate report every dose of vaccine administered, nor historical immunizations reported by the patient.
  • The data in MIIC may include children who have moved elsewhere, artificially inflating the denominator. When a child moves out of Minnesota, their MIIC record may not be updated to reflect their move, so the child may be mistakenly counted as a resident who is not up-to-date on their vaccinations.
  • Cross border-state immunization data exchange is limited to Wisconsin and North Dakota. Vaccines received in Wisconsin and North Dakota by Minnesota residents are in MIIC, but there is no similar data exchange with South Dakota or Iowa at this time.

There was a nationwide shortage of Hib vaccine from December 2007 to September 2009. This shortage reduced immunization coverage percentages for Hib and the childhood series in the 2010 MIIC data.

To learn more about MIIC-based childhood immunization data, contact the Minnesota Immunization Information Connection (MIIC) in the MDH Immunization Program.